「壁花男孩」與綠色和平守護北極 冰下沉入時空膠囊 | 環境資訊中心

「壁花男孩」與綠色和平守護北極 冰下沉入時空膠囊

2013年04月18日
摘譯自2013年4月15日ENS荷蘭,阿姆斯特丹報導;姜唯編譯;蔡麗伶審校

本月14日,綠色和平組織北極遠征隊將綁著守護北極旗幟的時空膠囊,沈入北極海床。在玻璃和鈦金屬製成的時空膠囊中,裝著270萬個守護北極運動參與者的名字。

綠色和平遠征隊將旗幟和時空膠囊沉入北極海床。從左到右:Josefina Skerk, Renny Bijoux, Ezra Miller, Kiera Kolson(照片由Christian Aslund/綠色和平提供)。

四位青年大使和支援團隊,經歷一周的冰上長途跋涉,頂著山脊的高壓,繞過冰冷的水池,終於成功將象徵「北極未來」的旗幟和時空膠囊沉入冰下4.3公里處的海床。

2007年,俄羅斯潛艇曾在北極插上俄羅斯國旗。今年,綠色和平在同一地點沉下環保旗幟,呼籲日漸暖化的北極應成為全球共同的保護區,避免工業開發的破壞。

四位志願者在北極發表部落格文章,「我們來此告訴世人,北極不屬於任何人或任何國家,北極是全世界的住民和物種共同擁有的。」

儘管殻牌石油經過2012年的挫折後已宣布暫停今年的北極鑽油計畫,ConocoPhillips和挪威Statoil公司也聲明2014年不會在北極鑽油,綠色和平仍持憂慮的態度,其「拯救北極」的行動指出,「北極沒有受到任何政府或軍隊的保護,但是許多國家和大企業都對北極的資源虎視眈眈。」

四位遠征北極的志願者在部落格上發聲,「北極原住民的生活方式深受無度的工業開發威脅,我們要和北極原住民們團結在一起,北極應禁止石油公司、工業化漁業進入,也不應是任何國家的領土。」

放下時空膠囊前,四位大使在這世界的最頂端進行祈願儀式,許下對北極的未來心願。

來到北極的四位志願者分別是美國演員Ezra Miller、瑞典薩米原住民Josefina Skerk、加拿大甸尼族原住民Kiera Kolson和來自非洲塞席爾群島的Renny Bijoux所組成。

「壁花男孩」演員Ezra Miller參與綠色和平「守護北極」行動。(照片由Christian Aslund/綠色和平提供)年僅20歲,曾演出電影〈壁花男孩〉的Ezra Miller在祈願儀式中許願,「我們期許全新的政治氣象,能夠尊重未來的世代,瞭解各種事物之間的關聯以及各種政策可能造成的結果。」「守護北極活動,象徵著我們人類和地球之母將重新建立良好的關係。」

瑞典薩米人是居住在歐陸北邊的原住民族,Josefina Skerk是薩米議會的成員。她說,「全世界最強勢的企業和政府對融化的北極不但袖手旁觀,更想要盡其所能剝削北極。我們對這塊土地上的先人承諾,也為這塊土地上未來的世代許願。」

甸尼族居住在加拿大西北方和北極圈內。甸尼族原住民Kiera Kolson是一位歌曲創作者、口語藝術家和原住民權益捍衛工作者。Kolson的祝禱詞是,「我們要保護北極這一塊淨土,不受破壞性的企業活動入侵,並藉此發揚原住民的人權和文化。」

來自非洲塞席爾群島的Renny Bijoux說,「我們這一代年輕人活在別人所形塑建構的世界裡。我們有權作出不同選擇。我來自非洲塞席爾群島,一個可能被上升的海平面淹沒的美麗小島。北極冰山融化不只威脅我的家園,還有數以億計的人們。」「我們要求領導者們認清氣候變遷對人類的影響,為了我們這一代跟下一代,通力合作解決問題。」

遠征隊出發前,Bijoux曾在部落格上解釋,為什麼來自非洲大陸東邊1500公里的印度洋小島的他,要來參與守護北極活動。

「你問我為什麼這麼在乎北極?到我的國家來住一天就知道了。塞席爾氣溫可高達攝氏33度,試想這有多熱,而其他國家甚至還有更高的!北極有幫助地球降溫的功能,讓我們尚可存活。」「如果我們對工業開發的威脅視而不見,已經開始融化的北極冰帽將會一直融化下去,全球的氣候模式會改變,讓格陵蘭這類以冰層為主的土地加速融化,這勢必會導致海平面上升,塞席爾等島國和其他低窪地區的國家都會受到嚴重的影響。」

「我們都在同一條船上。地球是我們的家園,照顧人類世世代代。我們不為它發聲,還有誰可以為它發聲?」

Greenpeacers Lower Flag, Time Capsule Beneath North Pole
AMSTERDAM, The Netherlands, April 15, 2013 (ENS)

Four trekkers on a mission with Greenpeace International planted a flag on the seabed beneath the North Pole on Sunday. The flag is attached to a glass and titanium time capsule containing the names of 2.7 million people who joined the Greenpeace campaign to Save the Arctic.

After a tough week-long trek across the frozen ocean, over giant pressure ridges and around pools of icy water with their support team, the four volunteers planted their "flag for the future" 4.3 kilometers (2.67 miles) beneath the ice.

They called for the region to be declared a global sanctuary to protect the warming Arctic from industrial development, noting that they planted the environmental flag at the same place where a submarine planted a Russian flag claiming the Arctic in 2007.

"We came to the Pole to say this special area of the Arctic belongs to no person and no nation, that it is the common heritage of everyone on Earth," the four blogged from the North Pole.

Although Shell Oil has withdrawn its plans to drill in Arctic waters in 2013 after a difficult 2012 drilling season, and ConocoPhillips and Norway's Statoil say they will not drill there in 2014, Greenpeace is still concerned.

As part of its Save the Arctic campaign, the nonprofit organization says, "There is no government or army to protect the Arctic, only countries and companies looking to carve it up."

The four trekkers blogged, "We stand in solidarity with Indigenous Peoples across the Arctic whose way of life is threatened by the unchecked greed of industry. We're asking that the area around the Pole be made off-limits to oil companies, industrial fisheries, and the claims of nation states."

Before lowering the pod, the four ambassadors held a ceremony at the top of the world, offering their wishes for the future, their dreams for a different tomorrow.

Film star Ezra Miller is one of the four who skied to the North Pole. The 20-year-old actor, who starred in "The Perks of Being a Wallflower, said during the North Pole ceremony, "We imagine a new politics that respects the next seven generations ahead and understands the connections between all things."

"By creating a sanctuary we will take a symbolic first step towards redefining our relationship with Mother Earth," Miller said.

Trekker Josefina Skerk from the Indigenous Sami community in Sweden is a member of the Sami parliament. She said, "Yet the world's most powerful companies and governments are not trying to slow this melting. Instead they want to exploit the place where we stand today. We offer these words with respect for those who came before us, and hope for those yet to be born."

Trekker Kiera Kolson is a Tso'Tine-Gwich'in woman from Denendeh, Canada who is a songwriter, spoken-word artist and defender of indigenous rights. She said, "We wish to create a sanctuary in the uninhabited area around the North Pole and keep destructive industry out of the Arctic. We see a world where the rights and culture of Indigenous Peoples are honored and respected."

Trekker Renny Bijoux said, "Young people like us are living in a world that has been shaped by others. We deserve a chance to set a different course. I come from the Seychelles, a beautiful island which could disappear under rising seas. The melting of the Arctic matters to my people, and billions more."

"We ask our leaders to recognize that climate change is upon us and to work together to fight it, for of us and for our children," said Bijoux.

In a blog post before setting out on the trek to the North Pole, Bijoux explained why he came from an archipelago in the Indian Ocean, some 1,500 kilometers (932 mi) east of mainland Africa to participate in this campaign.

"Why do I care so much for the Arctic, you ask? Just come live a day in Seychelles, and you'll understand. On my home island the temperature reaches up to 33 degrees Celsius and you can imagine how hot that is. There are even countries where the temperature is even higher! The Arctic helps in cooling the earth, thus making our lives much more bearable," Bijoux wrote.

"If we all turn a blind eye to the coming threat of destructive industrial development, the ice cap at the top of the world will melt as it has started to, changing the weather patterns in the world, making the land-based ice sheets like Greenland melt faster," wrote Bijoux. "That of course this will bring about a rise in sea level whereby Seychelles and other island states and low-lying countries will be affected."

"We are all in this together," Bijoux wrote. "This is our planet and we all need to look after her just like she's been looking after us for centuries. If we don't fight for her, who will??"

※ 全文及圖片詳見:ENS